Obituary for Greg Flowers

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Greg Flowers
Gregory Eugene Flowers, 60, of Fayetteville died Of heart disease Tuesday, April 18, 2017, in Springdale. He was born February 16, 1957, in Fayetteville to George and Josie Flowers. He was preceded in death by his father.

Flowers was a member of the Fayetteville High School Class, the members of which also knew him by the nickname of “Gravy” or occasionally “Gravy Train.” One friend recalled how he got the nickname: Back in 1964, Greg and Michael Buchanan attended a Boys Club summer camp. Greg called Michael “mashed potatoes” and Michael called Greg “gravy.”

Greg attended the University of Arkansas, where he became a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. He was co-owner of Bullpen BBQ, and he formed and coached a city league basketball team named the Train Gang.

He is survived by his mother, Josie Flowers of Fayetteville; sons, Spencer Flowers of Fayetteville, Darnelle and wife Lindsey Flowers of Denver, Colorado, Monty and wife Stephanie Flowers of Fayetteville, and Johnathan and wife Sarah Flowers of Atlanta, Georgia; a daughter, Alexa Flowers of Fayetteville; a brother, George Flowers of Farmington; a sister, Tommie and husband Lawrence Davis of Little Rock; seven grandchildren; and a host of nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be 10 a.m. Saturday, April 22, at Beard’s Chapel with Gary Noble officiating. Interment will follow in Oak Cemetery under the direction of Beard’s Chapel. The family will receive friends from 5-7 p.m. Friday, April 21, 2017 at the funeral home. Condolences at www.beardsfuneralchapel.com.

Greg Flowers

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Grade 4, Washington Elementary

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Mrs. Phelps’ fourth-grade class during the 1967-68 school year at Washington Elementary.

Front row, from left: Emmitte Watson, Stephan Trachant, Sam Featherston, and Michael Jackson.

Second row: Genie Gunn, Kathy Bell, Ada Atha, Michael Vanderlip, Jennifer Jacks, Jackie Audrain, and Selina DeForest.

Third row: Jerry Gilbow, Becky Riggs, Harold Hutton, Melissa Upchurch, Nikki Kirkton, Debbie Drake, Mark Bassett, Randy Schmidt, and Mrs. Phelps.

Fourth row: Billy Cunningham, Regina Smith, Barbara Lacey, Michael Buchanan, Kathy Wagnon, Eddie Logue, Chris Reynolds, and Matt Holtzen.

Courtesy of Becky Riggs

Price$

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Theresa Smith thoughtfully searches for a Prom dress.
Donna Moore, Jackie Audrain, Scott Fedosky and Kathy Trice aid in raking in the money during cap and gown measurements.
Jackie Audrain, Scott Fedosky and Kathy Trice aid in raking in the money during cap and gown measurements.
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Steve Jones works behind the counter at Mr. Tux, a formal wear rental store.
 Linda Bixby folds her invitation order which had to accompanied by a $10 deposit.
Linda Bixby folds her invitation order which had to accompanied by a $10 deposit.

Cost of Leaving

While the approach of graduation meant many things to different people, to all seniors it meant dishing out the dough. From the summer before to the summer after the senior year, students were paying for all those “seniory” things.

It started with the senior ring, averaging $60 to $70. Then came senior portraits. Most seniors spent $30 or more.

From the beginning of that final year, seniors prepared for the big day, graduation. Before they had time to realize they were seniors, they were ordering invitations. Some managed to escape with only a $5 to $6 charge, but the cheapest package was $9.35 and the most expensive was $26.55. And many ordered extras and bought a memory book for $3.20, a senior key for $4.50 to $6.50 and a picture album for $4. In addition, a cap and gown, which was required for uniformity of color, meant another six bucks.

Planning for a college education was also costly. ACT and SAT tests cost $6.50 to $7.50, which included sending the results to three colleges. Transcripts to accompany applications were priced at $1 after the first one.

As graduation drew nearer, so did another big event, the Senior Prom. The cost for this wing-ding could vary sharply. Tickets, which came out of the guy’s pocket, ran $5 a couple. Dinner, depending on how cheap the guy was, ranged from $3 at McDonald’s to $20 at the Farmer’s Daughter. Then the poor fellow had to rent a tux, another $15 to $40, and buy a corsage for his date. If he went the daisy route he spent about $2.50; if he was extravagant he paid $10 for an orchid.

A new dress for the girls could be made for as little as $20, but many preferred to buy one read made for at least $50. And her date had to have flowers too, a boutonniere for $1.50.

If you added it up, the bill for the senior year came to $260. But most seniors agreed that the memories were worth every cent.

— 1976 Amethyst

Large Group

Curtis Malone provides his own entertainment during psychology large group.
Curtis Malone provides his own entertainment during psychology large group.
Mrs. Mary Jane White takes her turn at the stand during her last semester on the senior English large group team.
Mrs. Mary Jane White takes her turn at the stand during her last semester on the senior English large group team.
Aaron Karp seems to be taking notes but look closely at how much he has written down.
Aaron Karp seems to be taking notes but look closely at how much he has written down.
Mike Bihn explains to Mrs. Kathy Roy why he was late to large group while Steve Yancey thinks up a good excuse.
Mike Bihn explains to Mrs. Kathy Roy why he was late to large group while Steve Yancey thinks up a good excuse.
Duane Spears, Tony West, Mike Buchanan and Read Hudson found that tilting the wheel helped their team in a senior English large group game.
Duane Spears, Tony West, Mike Buchanan and Read Hudson found that tilting the wheel helped their team in a senior English large group game.

High School Nap Time

To the casual observer, large group was a room full of 50 to 150 students — some sleeping, some taking notes, some reading day old assignments and others daydreaming the hour away.

For the students it was an inevitable part of the high school experience, since large group formed an integral part of all English classes as well as psychology, history and accounting.

Most students learned to place each large group session into one of four categories and looked forward to the class with anticipation or dread according to its classification. These were 1) the filmstrip, film, record category including W.C. Fields films and broken filmstrips, 2) the note taking period complete with the date Emily Bronte’s sister’s dog died, 3) the guest speaker, 4) the games, so aptly recalled by Nicky Gyles.

“I feel the large group system stands on a basically sound theory. However, one aspect of large group did cause me emotional anguish. Games involving singling out certain individuals and the social ridicule which followed was quite exasperating, especially when it happened to me.”

According to Mrs. Kathy Roy, senior English teacher, the purpose of large group was to allow speakers to talk to all the students at once as their schedules might not permit them to speak to each class individually. Large group also enabled teachers to shae the work load of offering lectures and showing filmstrips.

“We are not here to entertain,” observed one teacher.

Student opinions, on the other hand, were mixed.

“It’s a good idea,” said John Horn. “One advantage is that it breaks the routine. Students find it boring because it’s to formal and teachers often have uninteresting presentations.”

“Large groups are beneficial when they are used for speakers, film strips and things like that,” pointed out Kathy Bell, “But at times they could be very boring.”

— 1976 Amethyst

Fashions

Jeff England and Shelley Faddis wear the results of the Amethyst clothing survey.
Jeff England and Shelley Faddis wear the results of the Amethyst clothing survey.

Clothes Call

Instead of showing you what magazines tell you that you wore, here are the results of a poll of 100 boys and 100 girls showing you what you really wore in 1976.

Jeff England and Shelley Faddis are shown wearing the results of the poll.

Generall, most people preferred casual, comfortable clothes, with uncomplicated lines. Jeans, either nice denim baggies or grungy Levi’s, were definitely the staple of everyone’s wardrobe. Guys (99% of them) and girls (75%) overwhelmingly chose jeans for starters.

Going from top to bottom, boys, on the average, had over-the-collar to shoulder length hair (at least before basketball season!). Shirts posed a problem since there was a wide choice, with T-shirts, work shirts, button-down shirts, football jerseys and sweaters to select, none received a clear majority. Holding up those popular jeans was a brown leather belt, and peeping out from under them, 50.4% of the time, were tennis shoes.

The muslin shirt hit big at FHS; Theresa Smith wears a muslin smock brightened with a patchwork yoke.
The muslin shirt hit big at FHS; Theresa Smith wears a muslin smock brightened with a patchwork yoke.

Checking out the girls, it was again difficult to find a clear choice in some areas. Jeans, a button-down print shirt with a solid sweater and a scarf would be a close composite. Shoulder length hair in soft windblown waves accounted for 63% of the hairstyles.

The girls seemed to be given to excesses in some areas. Most wore four bangle bracelets, at least three rings, and two-inch heels or platforms. Nail polish, pierced loops, a pendant on a long delicate chain, a leather purse and wild socks completed the composite girl.

While results of the poll were interesting they did not mean FHSers were fad-following sheep. The individuals were like the cherry on top of the ice cream — the occasional song lyric embroidered on a shirt, father’s old varsity sweater or Jeff Thomas’s Elton John shirts.

— 1976 Amethyst

From left, Paige Gibson, Rich Worsham, Pat Flynn and Phil Brown model the latest in the back-to-school super casuals.
From left, Paige Gibson, Rich Worsham, Pat Flynn and Phil Brown model the latest in the back-to-school super casuals.

Excuses

Debbie Norris and Betsy Perkins wait patiently for their turns at the check out desk.
Debbie Norris and Betsy Perkins wait patiently for their turns at the check out desk.
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Mr. Duncan signs blue slips to returning students.
Mike Bryant, right, finds Don Carter's "note from home?" rather humorous but Don seems to think it'll work.
Mike Bryant, right, finds Don Carter’s “note from home?” rather humorous but Don seems to think it’ll work.

Singing the Blues

If there had been an Academy Award for the best excuse for missing class, it would have been a tough decision. Having practice for 10 years or more, students have come up with some pretty good ones.

There are a few all time favorites — “I had a flat.” “I ran out of gas.” And of course, “I had to go to a funeral.” But when asked who passed away, the answer was always “my grandmother” — for the third time.

But then there were the real excuses — “I was sick.” The actual kinds of sickness varied with the imagination of the students. There were the ones with a cold, then there were the ones with an upper respiratory infection and the most imaginative had “rhinitis.”

So, who’s to say who was sick and who was faking. It all depended on how imaginative you were in deciding your illness, how convincing you were when having your parents write your note (or how brave you were in forging it), and how serious you looked when you got your blue slip.

A few excuses from the mother of Bruce Q. Shark for her absentee son:

Dear Attendance Person, Bruce Q. was not in school per 1-3 yesterday. He got his foot stuck in the porcelain utility. Mrs. E. Shark

To whom it may concern: Bruce was not in school periods 1-3 yesterday. He thought it was Washington’s birthday & overslept. Mrs. Ethel Shark

Mr. Duncan, Bruce Q. Shark was not in school yesterday 1-3 periods. Did you really miss him? Mrs. Shark

— 1976 Amethyst

Senior Class Play: Showboat

The senior class play for 1976 was the musical "Showboat." The cover of the original musical score shows Kathryn Grayson and Howard Keel upper right and Ava Gardner lower. Courtesy of Dot Neely.
The senior class play for 1976 was the musical “Showboat,” by Oscar Hammerstein and Jerone Kern and based on the novel by Edna Ferber. The cover of the original musical score shows Kathryn Grayson and Howard Keel upper right and Ava Gardner lower. Courtesy of Dot Neely.

Studying?

Karan Carpenter asks Terry Fraley to show her how to do her homework.
Karan Carpenter asks Terry Fraley to show her how to do her homework.

Wise Up

“Studying is going over material for a test or doing homework,” defined Vickie Hileman. “When I study I get off and get the material I need and study until I’m really tired,” she continued.

Don Carter and Laura McKinnon had a different view of studying, one that was perhaps more typical.

“Learning new material the night before the test is my approach,” said Don.

Laura preferred to “go back and put together the material that I’ve learned.”

While Vickie chose to study in a secluded place where she could be alone, some students preferred background music from a radio or stereo. Others chose the library and a friend to quiz them.

How much did most students study? Don Carter summed it up when he said, “Never enough!”

— 1976 Amethyst